PACE Turf - Turfgrass Information Center

Dealing with Low Quality Irrigation Water: The Fairbanks Ranch Country Club Research Study

The movement to conserve water resources has led to increasing pressure on golf courses to utilize l...

Cyanobacteria (A.K.A. blue-green algae): WANTED for causing serious damage to turf

There are three widely shared misconceptions about the small, photosynthetic microbes that produce d...

Improving Disease Control

The recent commercial introduction of several new fungicide active ingredients (azoxystrobin, flutol...

Black Layer: A Symptom - Not the Cause of Anaerobic Soils

When soils become anaerobic (oxygen-free), turf roots “suffocate”, leading to wilting, y...

To Overseed or not to Overseed:  It’s a Matter of “Degree”

Deciding whether overseeding is the right strategy for your golf course depends on an overwhelming n...

Selecting Bunker Sands: Between a Rock and a Hard Place?

Selecting a bunker sand sometimes seems like a no-win situation.  This is partly because some o...

Genetically Engineered Crops: The Problem or the Solution?

Genetic engineering is a tool that has the potential to dramatically change agriculture, and in so d...

PACE Turfgrass Research Institute 1999 Research Results

The PACE Turfgrass Research Institute (PTRI) completed 16 research projects (see page 4 for listing)...

Fairy Ring and Localized Dry Spot: New Management Approaches

Symptoms caused by the fairy ring complex of fungi include the formation of dark green rings and cir...

Gaeumannomyces (Gay-man-o-myces)

The fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis causes several diseases that attack the roots of cool- and warm-s...

Guidelines for Control of Poa annua, Plus an Update on the Redgum Lerp Psyllid

There are no miracle cures for control of annual bluegrass, one of the most troublesome and persiste...

Black Turfgrass Ataenius Management Programs for 1999

White grubs continue to be some of the most difficult turf insect pests to control due to their cryp...

Black Cutworm Sampling and Control Programs for 1999

Larvae of the black cutworm are the dominant insect pests of turf in much of the United States. ...

Issues in the Use of Reclaimed Water on Golf Courses

Production of reclaimed water is a popular approach for conserving one of our most important resourc...

Getting a Head Start on Summer: Aeration Programs for Healthier Greens

The two-part greens aeration program outlined below can help improve turf health, especially during ...

Moss Control: New Data and Management Strategies

Based on newly generated research data, a program to control mosses on putting greens was developed....

New and Emerging Turfgrass Diseases

New disease problems emerge periodically as a result of unusual weather patterns, ever-increasing ex...

Carbon Dioxide - Friend or Foe?

Soil CO2 levels above 3% will result in plant stress.  To avoid accumulation of CO2 in the soil...

Anguina pacificae - seed and leaf gall nematode

Anguina pacificae (AP) - the seed and leaf gall nematode - is the most threatening plant disease of ...

It’s Too Darn Hot!  High Temperature Stress and Turf Health

The National Climatic Data Center recently reported that July, 1998 was the hottest recorded month o...

PTRI 1998 Field Research Update

During 1998, the PACE Turfgrass Research Institute (PTRI) will complete the 19 research projects lis...

All Worms Are NOT Created Equal: A Look at Earthworms, Black Cutworms and Stem Nematodes

The word “worm”, defined by Webster’s Dictionary as “any of numerous relativ...

Mosses on Golf Course Greens: An Emerging Problem?

It’s growing nicely and gradually spreading across your new putting green—and it’s...

Water Amendments - Gypsum, Acid, and Sulfur Burners!

Irrigation water quality and soil chemistry go hand-in-hand. Whatever elements and chemicals are in...

Weed Management Programs for 1998

If you had to choose, which weeds would you consider the most troublesome on your golf course? ...

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